Tag Archives: Literary Travelers Guide to the Gulf South

Legendary UFO Sightings Earn Gulf Coast Towns “Historic” Recognition UFOs at the historical society? Why not? As my cousin Susan Pierce pointed out, UFOs are part of the legend of a community. I had discounted including the books written about … Continue reading

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A Victorian Literary Train Stop: DeFuniak Springs’ Chautauqua

The most picturesque and historic literary site in the Florida Panhandle is the quaint town of DeFuniak Springs. Sprawling across I-10 (the northern geographic boundary of my book A Literary Traveler’s Guide to the Gulf South), DeFuniak Springs began as … Continue reading

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South Alabama gals started something that’s still going strong

It’s hard to believe no one has written a dissertation or a book on my latest quest — women writers from Mobile, Alabama. My day trips to Mobile and online visits to Amazon have confirmed my belief that Mobile women … Continue reading

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ALL ABOARD FOR READING ADVENTURE

Climbing the magical Dr. Seuss stairs into Story Tree Books brought back childhood (and I confess, adult) memories of climbing aboard a bookmobile. I love the experience of being on wheels, closed in, and surrounded by shelves laden with books. … Continue reading

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Cancel Culture: Time Will Tell if the Pen is Mightier Than the Sword

Ryan Park in Mobile, Alabama, is a sad place this Saturday afternoon. I arrive to see if the six-foot bronze statue of the Catholic priest, sometimes called the Poet of the Confederacy, is still standing.  It is – amidst broken … Continue reading

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Literary Mobile: On the Street Where You Live

When my hometown of Pascagoula, Mississippi, renamed the street where my parents lived, my father glowed with pride. Our address now read Paul Harvey Avenue, named for the popular author and radio commentator. We’d moved up in social circles. Our … Continue reading

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Detours on the Literary Traveler’s Road

Visiting a site I’m researching for my book often propels me on a different path. I’m suddenly rushing to the library or bookstore or logging on to Amazon.com to find a book someone has recommended about the place or the … Continue reading

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Literary Traveling: Artist and Writer Walter Anderson

“Walter Anderson was a master of social distancing.”  That clever six-foot warning adhered to the floor of the Walter Anderson Museum of Art gave me one of the best belly laughs of the pandemic. Yes, that man rowed a dinghy … Continue reading

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Mississippi’s lost literary landmark still inspires writers

I stood in the very house where Oscar Wilde and Samuel Clemens once stood.  And I walked on the same solid cypress plank floors where three famous women writers walked. Southern authors Sarah Dorsey, Varina Davis and Winnie Davis all … Continue reading

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Beginning in Bay St. Louis: the real Visitor’s Center

No more rummaging through tourist information racks for me. From now on when I travel, I’m stopping at the destination’s library first. When fact-checking for my upcoming book in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, I stopped at the Bay St. Louis-Hancock … Continue reading

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