National Gumbo Day – Bitter-Sweet with a Sprinkle of Filé

My book is now available on Amazon.

After a year and a half of writing and revising, my book is now available on Amazon. The slice-of-life collection, inspired by family, friends, students and colleagues. explores day-to-day adventures in a quest for meaning. Photo by Diane Skelton

National Gumbo Day – yesterday – was bitter-sweet at our house. My book The Gumbo Diaries: Mississippi & Beyond premiered on Amazon and the first box of copies arrived. But, cooking a pot of gumbo was bitter-sweet. I made Cajun Sausage and Seafood Gumbo in honor of Paul Prudhomme, the Louisiana chef who brought Cajun cooking into the spotlight. He was buried yesterday, National Gumbo Day, in classic New Orleans style. White-jacketed chefs carried his casket into St. Louis Cathedral at Jackson Square and following mass, hundreds of mourners formed a second line and followed a brass band to K-Paul’s Kitchen, his famous restaurant.

St. Louis Cathedral at the funeral of Paul Prudhomme. Advocate staff photo by Eliot Kamenitz

St. Louis Cathedral at the funeral of Paul Prudhomme. Advocate staff photo by Eliot Kamenitz. For more photos of the funeral coverage visit Advocate Funeral Coverage

In the past, October 12 has meant Columbus Day for me, but this year the pairing of National Gumbo Indigenous Peoples DayDay with Indigenous Peoples Day seemed particularly appropriate. After all, the Choctaw put the filé in gumbo. Choctaw blood runs through my veins all the way down to my feet, which I explain in “These Feet Were Made for Walking” in my book.

It’s nice I have a copy of Paul Prudhomme’s Louisiana Kitchen cookbook around whenever I want to remember him. And, I’m glad my light-hearted, slice-of-life collection The Gumbo Diaries: Mississippi & Beyond is a reality. Somewhere down the road, somebody just might want to remember me.

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About thegumbodiaries

On the search for the perfect gumbo!
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3 Responses to National Gumbo Day – Bitter-Sweet with a Sprinkle of Filé

  1. solosocial says:

    I like your mentioning of Indigenous People’s Day. Yes, it’s strange that we still observe Columbus Day–his landings being the beginning of the end for Native Americans. And he didn’t even land in what is now the United States–so his landings really have no relevance to U.S. history. (Columbus was also the first to bring Africans to the Americas as slaves.)

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    • I was glad to hear my second-grade granddaughter talking about Native American Day. I don’t think second-graders can pronounce “indigenous.” Thank you for the interesting Columbus fact — I only knew about the African servant traveling with Cabeza de Vaca in 1527.

      Like

  2. Pingback: Off to college: educating and elevating, Cajun-style | The Gumbo Diaries

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